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    new gull
     
     Curriculum Information (click link)
     
     
    Students have the opportunity to earn college credits through our Gull Flight School. Click on the link below for more information. Connect with Mr. Wilson, our supervisor of curriculum, at wilsonc@ptbeach.com for more information.
     
     
     

    The following courses are weighted: All AP Courses, Physics, Precalculus, Italian IV and Spanish IV. For rank computations only, ten points will be added to the course final average.

     

    Advanced Placement Courses

    Advanced Placement Biology                            

    6 Credits
    Grades 11, 12
    Prerequisites: General Biology and Chemistry, (with a minimum grade of 90 in each) Placement Exam

    AP Biology is an introductory college level course offered to select students which is designed to provide interested and qualified students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge and analytical skills needed to pursue a college major and possible career in the rapidly changing science of biology.  Because of the range and depth of topics, including laboratory work, considerable time and effort is required of the student.  AP Biology is offered only to students who have successfully completed both Biology and Chemistry with a grade of not less than 90 in these subjects and with teacher recommendation.  The final decision on acceptance will be made by the AP Biology teacher, test scores, and available space. Physics may be taken either subsequent to or concurrently with AP Biology, or even the following year, but should not be bypassed by anyone interested in any branch of science as a college major.   Students will be encouraged to take the Advanced Placement Examinations in the spring in order to earn college credit or placement at cooperating institutions.

               

    Advanced Placement Calculus AB                                        

    5 Credits
    Grades 11, 12

    This course is designed for students desiring credit for one semester of College Calculus.  The content is much more rigorous than the introduction they received in Pre-Calculus.  The major topics covered are the limit concept and the differentiation and integration of various types of functions together with their applications.  The course is enhanced with the use of the TI-89 Graphing Calculator to analyze and solve problems.  The Calculus Tool Kit and software is used to model three dimensional problems.  Students will be encouraged to take the Advanced Placement Examination in the Spring, in order to earn college credit or placement at cooperating institutions.

    Advanced Placement-BC                                        

    5 Credits
    Grade 12
    Prerequisite:  AP Calculus AB

    This course serves as basis for all further study in mathematics.   Topics covered have applications in engineering, technical fields, medicine, and for math and science majors and their related fields.  Course consists of review of all AP Calculus AB topics and covers topics relevant to BC Calculus such as Polar Coordinates, Epsilon delta definition, derivatives of vector functions and parametrically defined functions, Simpson's Rule, Infinite Sequences and series.

    Advanced Placement Chemistry                    

    7 Credits
    Grades 11, 12
    Prerequisite:  Algebra II, Biology and Chemistry (with a 90 average)

    Advanced Placement Chemistry is a college level General Chemistry course that may be taken during a student's junior or senior year.  Students should have successfully completed Algebra II as well as Biology and Chemistry with an average of not less than 90 in these subjects.  Physics may be taken either subsequent to or concurrently with Advanced Placement Chemistry, or even the following year, but should not be "bypassed" by anyone interested in further studies in science. There are two "double periods" each week used for laboratory work and problem solving sessions.  All students in Advanced Placement Chemistry are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement Examination in the spring in order to earn college credit or placement at cooperation institutions.

    Advanced Placement English Language and Composition
    5 Credits
    Grade 11& 12

    This course is open to selected juniors who have achieved a 90 or better average and a recommendation from their tenth grade English teacher.  They must also pass a writing assessment in the spring of their sophomore year.  The final decision on acceptance will be made by the AP teacher.   They must have demonstrated superior skills in English I and II and be willing to make a commitment to fulfill more difficult reading and writing assignments. The study of language skills will be on a higher level than seen before.  Emphasis will be placed on mastering writing and analytical skills as well as research techniques.  In literature, the curriculum will mirror English III British Literature but include nonfiction and critical writings on the literature read.  Students will be encouraged to take the Advanced Placement Language and Composition Examination in the spring, which will offer college credit or placement at cooperating institutions.

    Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition
    5 Credits
    Grade 11 & 12

    This course is for students who have either successfully completed AP III or have a grade of 90 or better and a recommendation from their English III teacher.  Students who did not take AP III must pass a writing assessment in the spring of their junior year.  The final decision on acceptance will be made by the AP teacher. The students selected to be in the course must be willing to make a substantial commitment in order to fulfill the assignments essential for completion of the course.  The study of language, composition, and literature will be on the college level. A great deal of emphasis will be placed on the mastering of composition skills, as well as the techniques of research.  The students will be required to complete a series of papers that are analytically critical in nature.   In literature, the students will be exposed to a variety of material in British, American, and World Literature, utilizing a chronological, genre approach.  The classroom atmosphere will be flexible and the setting will have the intimacy of a seminar.   Students will be encouraged to take the Advanced Placement Examination in the spring, which will offer college credit or placement at cooperating institutions.

    Advanced Placement American History                                

    5 Credits
    Prerequisite: US 1
    Grade 11

    This course is open to select college-bound juniors who have demonstrated superior performance in social study skills.  The students selected to be in the course must be willing to make a substantial commitment in order to fulfill the assignments essential for completion of the course.  The study of history and research will be on the college level.  A great deal of emphasis will be placed on the mastering of writing skills, as well as the techniques of research.  The students will be required to complete a series of papers that are a serious examination of the topics covered in class.   The classroom atmosphere will be flexible and the setting will have the intimacy of a seminar.  Students will be encouraged to take the Advanced Placement Examination in the spring, which will offer college credit or placement at cooperating institutions.

    Advanced Placement Music Theory                                                    

    5 Credits
    Grades 11, 12

    Advanced Placement Music Theory offers the student the opportunity to expand musical skills into writing and arranging for vocal and instrumental groups of various sizes.   The course covers transposition techniques, rhythm section, rhythmic alterations of melody, harmony in keyboard, close and open position, and principles of arrangement.  The course includes sight singing and ear training.

    Advanced Placement Physics C                                               

    7 Credits
    Prerequisites:  Physics, Pre-Calculus.  Must also have AP Calculus AB as either a prerequisite or co-requisite.

    Advanced Placement Physics C is a college-level Physics course intended for students planning to study science, engineering, or other technical disciplines beyond high school. Although most of the specific content areas of this course are set by The College Board, practical applications of the topics covered and more "in-depth" coverage of select topics are included in this course, as time constraints and student interest allows.  There are two "double periods" each week used for laboratory work and problem solving sessions.  Students will be encouraged to take the Advanced Placement Examination in the spring, which will offer college credit or placement at cooperating institutions. Independent of whether students take the AP exam and receive college credits, the primary goal of this course is to give them a solid college-level background in calculus-based Physics which will serve them well in their future studies.

    Advanced Placement Spanish Language                                                             

    5 Credits
    Prerequisite: Spanish IV
    Grade 12

    The AP Spanish course is designed to prepare students to understand lectures in Spanish;  to participate actively in literary discussions, as well as everyday conversations; to perform a close reading of Hispanic literary texts in all genres; and to analyze the form and content of literary works both orally and in writing with  an emphasis on conversation and composition.  Works from both Spain and Latin America are incorporated as well as newspapers, magazines, tapes and programs from television.   This course is comparable to a third year university course.  Students will be encouraged to take the Advanced Placement Examination in the spring, which will offer college credit or placement at cooperating institutions.

    Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics    

    5 Credits
    Grades 11, 12

    This course is open to select college-bound seniors who have demonstrated superior performance in social study skills.  The students selected for this course must be willing to make a substantial commitment in order to fulfill the assignments essential for completion of the course.  The study of governmental history, function, political theory and research will be on the college level.  A great deal of emphasis will be placed on the mastery of writing skills.  The students will be required to come to class prepared to discuss all issues germane to the course after a very brief preparation period focusing on the test and self-initiated outside sources.  An interest in the nature of government and politics is expected.  Students will be encouraged to take the Advanced Placement Examination in the spring, which will offer college credit or placement at cooperating institutions.

    Advanced Placement World History
    5 Credits
    Grades: 9-12
    The purpose of the AP World History course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts in different types of human societies.  This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. The course highlights the nature of changes in global frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. It emphasizes relevant factual knowledge, leading interpretive issues, and skills in analyzing types of historical evidence. Periodization, explicitly discussed, forms an organizing principle to address change and continuity throughout the course.  Specific themes provide further organization to the course, along with consistent attention to contacts among societies that form the core of world history as a field of study.
     
    Advanced Placement Human Geography
    5 Credits
    Grades: 10-12
    The purpose of the AP Human Geography course is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth¿s surface. Students learn to employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications.
     
    Advanced Placement Computer Science Principles
    5 Credits
    Grades: 10-12
     No coding experience required.  AP Computer Science Principles introduces you to the essential ideas of computer science with a focus on how computing can impact the world. Along with the fundamentals of computing, you will learn to analyze data, information, or knowledge represented for computational use; create technology that has a practical impact; and gain a broader understanding of how computer science impacts people and society.
     
    Advanced Placement Computer Science A
    5 Credits
    Grades: 10-12
    AP Computer Science A is equivalent to a first-semester, college level course in computer science. The course introduces students to computer science with fundamental topics that include problem solving, design strategies and methodologies, organization of data (data structures), approaches to processing data (algorithms), analysis of potential solutions, and the ethical and social implications of computing. The course emphasizes both object-oriented and imperative problem solving and design using Java language. These techniques represent proven approaches for developing solutions that can scale up from small, simple problems to large, complex problems. The AP Computer Science A course curriculum is compatible with many CS1 courses in colleges and universities.
     
    Advanced Placement Statistics
    5 Credits
    Grades: 11-12
    The AP Statistics course is equivalent to a one-semester, introductory, non-calculus-based college course in statistics. The course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. There are four themes in the AP Statistics course: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. Students use technology, investigations, problem solving, and writing as they build conceptual understanding.
     

    English Courses I, II, III, IV

    English I                                            
    5 Credits
    Freshman English is concerned with the development of critical thinking skills through reading and writing.  It is a Literature Survey course concentrating on the short story, vocabulary, poetry, Greek Mythology, the novel and drama.   Students read five novels and study one Greek drama, one Shakespearean and three modern plays.  Freshman are also given a comprehensive review of grammar, usage and punctuation as well as a concentrated emphasis on writing in the content areas.
     
    English II                                           
    5 Credits
    Sophomores study the Literature of America, from the work of the colonial writers to 20th century drama, poetry and prose.  Major writers studied include Poe, Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Dickinson, Whitman, Twain, Faulkner, Hemingway, Steinbeck, Frost, Wilder, and O'Neill.  Literary works are studied both in class and as part of assigned outside reading.  The major piece of writing done this year is the research paper, a formal report on an in-depth investigation, thoroughly documented by footnotes and bibliography.
     
    English III                                        
    5 Credits
    Juniors look at the literature of Great Britain, the forerunner and early model  for that of America.  They begin in the 18th century with the great Anglo-Saxon epic, Beowolf , and processed through the years with Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Swift, Burns, Wordsworth, Coleridge, and the other Romantics, and end with the Victorians:  Tennyson, Browning, Hardy, Dickens, and Kipling.  Modern and contemporary authors are emphasized in the fourth marking period.  In writing, the stress is on literary analysis and the expanded research paper, SAT vocabulary and preparation for SAT testing are included.
     
    English IV                                        
    5 Credits
    Seniors study world literature starting with the Epic of Gilgamesh and following with early Egyptian, Hebrew, Persian, Arab, Indian, Chinese, and Japanese literature.  Classical Greek and Roman civilization is studied also.  Major authors covered include Dante Alighieri, Machiavelli, Gorthe, Hugo, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Kafka, and the contemporary authors of Europe, Africa, and Asia.  Writing of analysis and research papers continue with a new addition, the reaction paper, a critical response to a reading assignment.  Writing required by colleges is stressed.
     
     

    English Electives

    Public Speaking
    Credits: 2.5 (1 semester)
    Grades: 11, 12
    Students we develop a positive attitude about public speaking, decrease speech anxiety, and learn how to organize, write, research and deliver brief talks with clarity.  Students we be able to identify and define basic communication theories, principles and key terms regarding speech delivery and evaluation.
     
    Writing about Humanities Rhetoric and Composition Study of Film
    5 Credits
    Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
    Students will use the film as the medium to improve their skills of composition and analyzing rhetoric. Students will utilize three categories of writing: theoretical writing, creative writing, and interpretive and analytical writing in their analysis of film and critical film reviews.

    Foreign Language

     

                                               
    Italian I, II, III, IV
    Italian I
    5 Credits
    Grades 9, 10, 11, 12
     My teaching philosophy is that Italian is a language you must "live" to learn. It's a language that you feel and that you come to understand as you come to understand the culture. If you learn a language from a textbook, trying to memorize vocabulary lists and looking up conjugations, you might be able to pass exams, but you'll likely have a very difficult time ever really speaking the language. Adults and teens must learn a language the way small children do: hearing it being spoken, making associations with words and meaning, using it as much as possible, making mistakes and then learning from them - basically immersing themselves in the language (at least 45 minutes a day) without worrying about translating what they are saying/hearing into English. I understand that not everyone will learn the language at the same pace nor in the same way. I work mainly with the oral language along with images and following up with the written form as a secondary way. My goal is not just that my students know Italian but that they actually "speak" Italian!
     
    Italian II
    5 Credits
    Grades 10, 11, 12
    In this course, you are expected to have satisfactorily completed Italian I.  You will be tested on your knowledge of this material after 10 days of class.  Italian II begins at the Novice High Level and ends at an Intermediate low level.  Only Italian will be spoken in class and instructions will also be written in Italian. The course includes the following: Textbook, Workbook, Lab once a week, Culture once a week, Daily Conversation and Culture Field Trips.  Your daily participation, classwork, ability to comprehend the spoken and written language as well as respond in Italian are all a major part of your grade.  You will also be given an exam at the end of each chapter unit, a mid-term and a final exam.

     a discussion and labortory-based study of the structure and function of the human body.  The study will include cellular anatomy & function, tissues, body systems and process.  This course is designed for college preparation, especially for biological and health career majors.



    Italian III
    5 Credits
    Grades: 11, 12
    In this course, you are expected to have satisfactorily complete Italian I and II.  You will be tested on your knowledge of this material after 10 days of class.  Italian III begins at an Intermediate Low Level and ends at an Intermediate High Level.  Only Italian will be spoken in class and instructions will also be written in Italian.  The course includes the following: Textbook, Workbook, Lab once a week, Culture once a week, Daily Conversation, Italian Literature (CD and Reader), and Culture Field Trip.  Your daily participation, classwork, ability to comprehend the spoken and written language as well as respond in Italian are all a major part of your grade.  You will also be given an exam at the end of each chapter unit, a mid-term and final exam.
     
    Italian IV
    5 Credits
                                                                                            Spanish
    Spanish I                                                    
    5 Credits
    Grades 9, 10, 11, 12
    In this first year course, a modified audio-lingual approach is used to build correct pronunciation, develop vocabulary and introduce basic grammatical concepts.   Speaking, listening and writing skills are developed through audio, visual and computer activities.  As much of the target language is used as possible, limited only by the student's operative vocabulary.
     
    Spanish II                                                    
    5 Credits
    Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
    This course is a continuation of the process begun in the first year.  Grammar becomes more complex, sentences more comprehensive, and vocabulary range more expansive.   Speaking, hearing, and writing the target language are still emphasized and utilized.  Spanish is the language most often used and English is employed only to explain (in as few words as possible) what a pupil may not understand.  Tapes, slides, video and computer software are still used for additional audio and visual drills.
     
    Spanish III                                                   
    5 Credits
    Grade 10, 11, 12
    A major shift of emphasis takes place in Level III in that reading, speaking, and writing occur in that order.  The readings are mostly original works written by Mexican, Central American, South American, or Spanish authors. The reading selection becomes the heart of the assignment.  It is read and discussed in Spanish, variations of the theme are in Spanish, and finally, a written version of the story is in Spanish.  Grammar is reviewed only as necessary.   Videos, tapes, CD's, LCD's, and computer software are introduced as they relate to the various lessons.
     
    Spanish IV                                                    
    5 Credits
    Grade 11, 12
    Writing becomes a major point of emphasis in this level, but speaking and reading retain an important position.  The study of culture per se is introduced more at this level.  In Spanish IV, the history and culture of Spain is more prominently discussed than in previous levels. This is the level that affords a final stage of language, the complete use of the target language in speaking, writing, reading.  Tapes, slides, CD'S, and Computers are used extensively.  Videos, tapes, and computer software and the web page are used to enhance history and culture as they are covered
     
     Mandarin I & II
    Mandarin 1
    5 Credits
    Grades: 9-12
    Mandarin Chinese I is an introduction Chinese language course for students who have none or little experience in the language.  This course will develop students' Chinese language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing.  Students will have the opportunity to apply those skills through real life communicative tasks.  This course will also build an understanding of the Chinese culture.
     
    Mandarin 2
    5 Credits
    Grades: 9-12
    Mandarin Chinese II is the second year Chinese language course for students who have taken Mandarin Chinese I.  This course will continue to develop students' Chinese language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as apply those skills in real life communicative tasks.    This course will also provide students with Chinese cultural experiences.
     
    Mandarin 3
    5 Credits
    Grades: 9-12
     

    Mathematics

    Algebra I

    5 credits

     

    Algebra I studies the structure of the real number system from an informal and intuitive approach.  Deductive reasoning is woven into the presentation, and the student is gradually led to think in terms of algebraic proof.  The topics discussed in Algebra I include operations with real numbers, solution of equations and inequalities, operations with polynomials, special products and factoring of polynomials, laws of exponents, operations with rational numbers and expressions, operations with and simplifying radical expressions, linear, exponential, and quadratic functions, relations, and systems of equations and inequalities in two variables.  In addition students will study probability and descriptive statistics including correlation between variables.  Emphasis is placed on problem solving and modeling the above concepts in real-world situations.  



    Algebra II

     5 credits

     

    In this course, there is a review and extension of the knowledge, techniques and skills learned in first year algebra.  The aim is to help the student gain sufficient skill and knowledge in algebra to meet the needs of those students who will continue the study of mathematics.  Aside from the topics covered in Algebra I, Algebra II includes topics in complex numbers, logarithms, trigonometry, arithmetic and geometric sequences, and the study of polynomial, square and cube root, and rational functions. Students are introduced to data analysis, and probability is also studied.  This course prepares a student for a course in Pre-calculus.

     

    Geometry

    5 credits

     

    The Geometry course balances the theories of Euclidean Geometry with the application of these theories.  Algebraic techniques are used throughout the course, particularly when dealing with polygons, circles, similar triangles, right triangles, trigonometry, coordinate geometry, area, and volume.  Students use deductive reasoning and the laws of logic to write formal proofs.

     
    PreCalculus
    5 credits
    Precalculus topics foreshadow calculus.  This course uses an interactive instructional approach that focuses on problem solving.  We use the power and speed of modern technology to apply a graphing approach to the course.  The topics covered include all functions with strong emphasis on trigonometric functions and analytic geometry, including conic sections.
     

    Consumer Mathematics

    5 credits

     

    This course reviews all basic operations as they apply to mathematics in consumer affairs.  Topics concerned are those which consumers are most likely to encounter in adult life.  The general topics covered are savings accounts, checking accounts, budgets, various loans, income, taxes, insurance (car, home, and life), home ownership, and retirement income.

     

    Integrated Math 1

    5 credits

     

    Integrated Math 1 is an introductory course to the High School Mathematics program.  The course reviews computation and problem solving techniques, while introducing the student to algebraic and geometry concepts.  Emphasis is placed on variables, expressions, integers, the coordinate plane, equations and inequalities, rational numbers and exponents, polynomials, ratios, proportions, percents, linear equations and functions, real numbers, right triangles, coordinate geometry, data analysis and probability.

     

    Integrated Math 2

    5 credits

     

    This course is designed for students who have completed algebra 1 and geometry.  It provides a review of the major topics in those courses and an introduction to the major topics in algebra 2.  The course also provides experience in data analysis and probability.  This course serves as a preparation for algebra 2 and as a preparation for college level math requirements.



    Survey of Math

    This course is a study of the history of mathematics and some of its' fundamental concepts. Topics include: sets, probability, logic systems of numeration, groups, and mathematical systems.

     

     

    Personal Financial Literacy

    2.5 credits - *Graduation Requirement
     

    The Personal Financial Literacy course offered at Point Pleasant Beach High School is called EverFi™ – Financial Literacy.  EverFi™ – Financial Literacy is an engaging, online resource that uses video, animations and interactive activities to bring complex financial concepts to life. EverFi tracks individual student progress and knowledge gain and provides students who successfully complete the course with certification in financial literacy, which can be a powerful tool for job, college and internship applications.

     

    Physical Education

    Students who take a science lab instead of a Physical Education class one day a week will receive 3 credits per year for Physical Education and 1 credit per year for Health.  All other students will receive 3-3/4 credits per year for Physical Education and 1-1/4 credits for Health.

    Physical Education                                        
    3 or 3 3/4 Credits
    Grades 9, 10, 11, 12
    Students are exposed to opportunities and activities that lead to total physical development.  Emphasis is on "Lifetime Sports".  The guidelines for lesson development are on furthering strength, agility, endurance, and promoting better physical skill performance and maintaining safe practices.  The intent of the program is to enhance the recreational opportunities of all young people during their remaining high school years and adult life.  Grade 9 students will take part in a ten week adventure program.

    Health I, II, III, IV

    Health I                                        
    1 or 1 1/4 Credits
    Grade 9

    The curriculum is designed to develop a health/wellness awareness of the need to keep one's body in the best mental and physical condition by refraining from smoking and the abusive use of substances.  The Family Life curriculum includes the following topics: (1) Human Sexuality, (2) Human Reproduction, (3) Sexually Transmitted Diseases, and (4) Adolescent Self-Esteem.

    Health II                                        
    1 or 1 1/4 Credits
    Grade 10
    The Driver Education program is driver's theory which requires a minimum of 30 hours of classroom instruction.  The New Jersey Driver Manual is used as the text and the state examination is administered at the end of the course.   Family Life curriculum includes the following topics: (1) Review of Human Reproduction, (2) Contraception, (3) Abortion, (4) Teenage Pregnancy.
     
    Health III                                        
    1 or 1 1/4 Credits
    Grade 11
    Nutrition and Family Planning along with teenage pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases are discussed.  Emphasis is also placed on the subjects of communicable disease, public health services, and health careers.   The Family Life curriculum includes the following topics:  (1) Review of the S.T.D.'s, (2) Incest, (3) rape, (4) Child Abuse, and (5) Homosexuality.
     
    Health IV                                        
    1 or 1 1/4 Credits
    Grade 12
    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is required for all seniors.   Upon successful completion of the course the students receive a CPR certification card.   The Family Life curriculum includes the following topics:  (1) Selecting a Marriage Partner, (2) Marriage and Family Planning, (3) Prenatal Care, (4) Parenting, and (5) Aging.

    Sciences  

    Anatomy and Physiology
    6 Credits
    Grade 12

     

    PrerequisitesSuccessful completion of General Biology and Chemistry.
    Human Anatomy & Physiology is a discussion and laboratory-based study of the structure and function of the human body.  The study will include cellular anatomy & function, tissues, body systems and processes.  This course is designed for college preparation, especially for biological and health career majors.

     
     
    Chemistry                                              
    6 Credits
    Grades 9, 10
    It is recommended that students have already passed Algebra I and taking Geometry.  Pre-Algebra is not a suitable mathematics preparation for this course.This course includes study of the chemical properties and reactions of substances from the viewpoint of the principles of atomic and molecular structure.  Laboratory work includes the preparation and study of the properties of various chemical compounds.
     
    Biology                                                    
    6 Credits
    Grades 10, 11
    Prerequisites:  Algebra I, Chemistry
    Biology is a general survey course which includes a first-semester emphasis on basic biochemical processes, genetics, an understanding of DNA as it related to heredity, and the processes of evolution.  Second semester will emphasize biological classifications systems, diversity of life, and the structure, characteristics,and needs of organisms.  An overview of the major kingdoms of organism -Bacteria, Protista, Fungi, Plantae, and Animalia- will include anatomy and physiology, the relationships among living things, conservation, diseases, and human biology.  One 90-minute laboratory each week will include basic laboratory equipment use, selected physiology studies, microscopic examinations, and dissections. Biology is recommended for 11th grade and higher.
     
    Physics                                           
    6 Credits
    Grades 11,12
    Prerequisites: Chemistry, Biology, and Algebra II
    Co-Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus
    This course includes a study of matter and energy and the laws governing their interplay.  The subjects of mechanics, heat, light, sound, electricity, magnetism, radiation, and atomic energy are investigated.  Laboratory work includes the study if the various physical phenomena and their effects.  It is recommended that admission to this course be limited to those students who have maintained a "C" average in three years of College Preparatory Math (Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II).  Pre-Calculus should be taken with this course.
     
    Environmental Science
    6 Credits
    Grades 9
    Prerequisites: General high school science knowledge
    The study of the environment, ecology, populations, energy resources & consumption, the study of water, air & land, and our health & future. Students will understand the methods of scientific inquiry, and employ these methods through laboratory investigations.
     

    Social Studies

    World History, US History I, II 

    World History                                                
    5 Credits
    Grade 9
    World History I is a required course for all freshman.  The purpose of the course is to give students an understanding of the development and culture of mankind. Special emphasis is placed on the building of research skills.  Units covered include: Prehistory; Ancient, Classical, and Medieval Civilization; and the cultural areas of Asia, Africa, Europe, South America, and the Middle East.
     
    United States History I and II                            
    5 Credits (each)
    Grades 10 , 11 (required)
    This two year study of United States History is designed to meet the requirements of New Jersey law and to provide all students the opportunity to explore the broad spectrum of American civilization.  The program of study is centered around a chronological approach, and each student pursues a wide variety of learning activities to discover for him/herself the substance of these topics.  Units covered in United States History I range from the Mexican War to World War I.  Units covered in United States History II are from World War I to Contemporary America.
     

    Social Studies Electives

    Criminal Justice
    2.5 Credits
    Grades: 12
     This course will analyze the major components of the criminal justice system and emphasize the importance of understanding the criminal justice system.  Topics are likely to include, but are not limited to: the Bill of Rights and criminal procedure, terrorism, juvenile delinquency, forensics, cybercrimes, gangs, drugs, police investigations, prosecutions, trial proceeding, corrections system, crime prevention.  Guest speakers (from various areas of the field of law enforcement) are likely to include, but not limited to the following career professionals: police officers, state troopers, judges, prosecutors and attorneys, federal air marshals, and probation officers.
     
    Constitutional Law
    Grade 12
    2.5 Credits
    Constitutional Law is a 12th grade elective course option.  The course content emphasizes contemporary constitutional issues facing the United States.  Focus is placed on the current year's US Supreme Court docket, the impact of landmark decisions/case law, the application of the Bill of Rights in contemporary society, and the ongoing debate over the constitutionality of today's "hot-button" political issues.  Students will regularly research and debate choice issues.
     
    American US Military History
    Grade 11, 12
    2.5 Credits
    A study of the U.S. Military history from the Colonial times to the 20th Century. Special emphasis is placed on the causes and results of wars, leaders and battles and the impact U.S. Military History has had both in the United States and the world.


    Sociology
    Grades 11,12                                        
    2.5 Credits
    This course is designed to prepared students for college level sociology.   The course emphasizes the scientific aspect of sociology.  Major units covered include Socialization, roles and Status, Social Stratification, culture, and Social Problems.
     
     
     
    Global Issues TV
    5 credits
    Grades: 11, 12
    A media production course, in which students plan, write, create, collaborate, and edit multimedia projects.  Students will master camera operation, using lighting, sound equipment, collaborating, shooting in studio as well as on location.  These projects are broadcast throughout the school, placed on the district website, entered into film festivals and incorporated into student portfolios.  The projects focus on school wide, local, national, and global issues that impact the world around us.
     
     
    A Cultural History of Barnegat Bay will be a one semester elective course reserved for Juniors and Seniors that will run in sequence with Historical Local Woodworking. The Social Studies semester requirement of the course will detail a cultural and maritime history of the Barnegat Bay watershed from the pre-colonial era to present day. 

    Historical Local Woodworking will be a one semester elective course reserved for seniors that will run in sequence with A Cultural History of Barnegat Bay. The Related Arts semester requirement of the course will focus on the local tradition of woodworking with a concentration on historical boat design and construction.
     
     
    Western Civilization I
     2.5 Credits
    Grades 12  
     
    A survey of Western history from the earliest civilzations to the beginning of the modern era.  Emphasis is placed on the changes through time in political, social and religious institutions as well as on intellectual and cultural achievements.  The course is designed to help the student better understand self and society by becoming acquainted with the past history of the Western world.
     
    Western Civilization II
    2.5 Credits
    Grade 12
    Prerequisite: Western Civilization I
     The survey of Western history is continued from the early modern period to the present.  The political, social and industrial revolutions of the 18th and 19th centuries are studied as a prelude to the military conflicts, social changes and intellectual currents of the twentieth century.  The course is designed to help students understand the world of today by studying the recent history of their own society.  

    Performing Arts

    Jazz Studies
     5 Credits
    Grades 9, 10, 11,12 
    Jazz Studies meets 5 times per week as an elective course.  Included in the course are the study of the history of  American jazz, elementary jazz style, music theory, and supervision in the field of jazz improvisation.  The Jazz Studies courses is the workshop for the Beach High School's Jazz Ensemble, a performing group which often competes with other jazz groups.  Prerequisite include pretesting for ability level and membership in the symphonic band.
     
    Morning Band
    6 Credits 
    Grades 9, 10, 11, 12                                         
        
    • This course is open to all high school students with a basic playing ability. Band members develop individual and group performance skills.
     It is the advanced performing group representing the total instrumental music program.  Band meets as a regularly scheduled elective course on a daily basis for six credits per year.  All members of Morning Band are required to attend out of school rehearsals and scheduled performances in which movement and musical marching skills, showmanship, and what goes into the preparation and production of and out door musical presentation will be developed.
    Band members are expected to participate in rehearsals, the concert season, and the marching band during the marching season.These performances include concerts, variety shows, exchange assemblies, community parades, concerts for the community, and all football games. 

     

     
    Musical Keyboarding
    5 Credits
    Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
    Keyboarding is a practical application course that would allow students who have not played an instrument to start.  It would also be available to current music students who wish to further improve on their instrument or start a new one.
    Students have the option to learn piano alone, or piano and another instrument of their choice.

     

     

     

     
    Music Industry
    5 Credits
    Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
    Explores the different avenues in which those interested in music can become employed outside of the performing or teaching aspects.  Students will complete hands-on practical experiences in order to explore potential careers in the music industry. These would include but would not limited to: music business, music licensing, journalism in music, administrative arts, audio engineering, live music production, composition, music management, backstage management, marketing &advertising, and stage management.  Project example: creation of your own music video (composing, storyboarding, production, filming, recording, mixing, and editing).  Hands on experience and technology-based course.  No prerequisites necessary.
     
    Musical Theater Practicum
    5 Credits
    Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
    Students will learn about the basics of musical theater, including various musical theater works, different performance venues, audition techniques, learning how to perform vocal pieces, monologue, and improvisation, and vocal collaboration.  They will also learn about the lighting, sound, set construction techniques, and rigging necessary to produce a musical.
    We will study a musical genre, and view a film within said genre.  We will then break down its functions, and perform small skits and vocal pieces from said film.

     

      Electives

    Technical Drawing I, II, III, Woodworking I, II, III
    Technical Drawing I
    5 Credits
    Grade 9,11,12                                                                            
    This is a full-year course wit emphasis on lettering, geometric construction, orthographic and isometric projections, auxiliary and sectional views, pattern development and an architectural floor plan.  Attention to detail is a prime consideration to be successful in the course.
     
    Technical Drawing II
    5 Credits
    Grades 11, 12                                                                              
    Prerequisite:  Technical Drawing I
    Emphasis is placed on advanced technique, mathematical applications, tolerances and refined skills that were learned in Drawing I.  Challenging problems include detailed threaded fasteners, gears and detail and assembly drawings.   Students will be introduced to CAD Drafting as time permits.
     
    Technical Drawing III                                                  
    5 Credits
    Grade 12
    Prerequisite: Technical Drawing II
    A field of study devoted entirely to architectural drafting. Architectural detail of building construction is the foundation of this course.   Students prepare and draw floor plans, elevations, and sectional views of residential homes and actually construct a scale model of a house.  Blueprinting is an integral part of this course.
     
    Woodworking I
    5 Credits
    Grades 9, 11,12                                            
    This is a detailed course in woodworking emphasizing materials, processes, and machines.  Areas of study are case construction, lamination, woodturning, and carving.  Required projects are assigned in each area with emphasis on workmanship and planning procedure.  Additional projects are optional.
     
     Woodworking II, III
     5 Credits
    Grades  11, 12                                                
    Prerequisite: Woodworking
    Students are instructed in cabinet making, wood laminating and wood turning with emphasis on the selection and use of materials.  Machines woodworking and industrial process are key elements of this course.  Students are to choose their own projects, keeping in mind good design and their own capabilities.  Students are responsible for costs of materials used in selected projects.   Students who have never taken woodworking, as well as those who have previously enrolled may take this course More than one level of skill is taught the course.

    Art I, II, III, IV

    Art I                                            
    5 Credits
    This course is designed as a full year course for students who are interested in 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional are projects.  Student expectations will be mastering skills and techniques essential to creating art.  The focus of this course is to establish a transition from techniques to medium.  Basic design concepts will be developed in drawing skills, and color theory will be incorporated into painting and coloring projects.  These skills, along with construction principles will be implemented in the 3 dimensional clay and plaster projects.
     
    Art II                                            
    5 Credits
    Prerequisite: Art I,
    This course is for students who have built the fundamental knowledge of art through Art I.  Students will be able to focus and concentrated on the application of various art mediums such as charcoal, pencil, p[en and ink, pastels, oil pastels, printing, acrylic painting, ceramics, plaster.  Students will be able to matte finished project and stretch a canvas.  Project concentration will be for Portfolio developing, career application, competitions, and gallery exhibitions.
     
    Art III and IV Independent Study
    5 Credits
    Prerequisite:  Art II
    These courses are designed for the advanced art student.  The student is expected t develop proficiency in the studio disciplines, have an understanding of art in relationship to art history, and continue to develop and refine his/her portfolio.   Students will challenge themselves by exploring various art styles, artists, cultures, and mediums.  Project concentration will be for portfolio development, career applications, competitions, and gallery exhibits.

    Computers

    Computer Graphics and Design I                                                
    5 Credits
    Grades 9, 11, 12
    Prerequisite: Computer I or Art I or Teacher Recommendation
    This course introduces students to the growing world of computer graphics.  The focus is on the development of foundational computer skills in image scanning technology, desktop publishing, digital photographic technologies, and basic output procedures (printing and web publishing).  Students explore the Corel Draw suite including Photo-Paint (image processing and basic animation), Draw (graphic design), and Dream 3-D (3-D rendering).  Projects integrated the use of the scanner and the digital camera.  A portion of the class will be dedicated to photography-digital and traditional SLR.  Students will investigate successful graphic design and web design in the process of developing their own original creations.   Graphics will be published to their personal websites, which act as a digital portfolio of their work.

    Foods I and II

    Foods I
    5 Credits
    Grades 9, 11, 12                             
    This course is designed to give the beginning student a basic, working knowledge of cooking techniques, and cooking vocabulary in order to operate successfully in the kitchen.  Units covered are quick breads, grains, pastry, fruit, cookies, eggs, and cheese.  Students will then move on to regional food preparation of foods common to the various regions around the United States, such as Creole, Southwest, Pennsylvania Dutch, Tex-Mex, etc.  Students will access the internet to investigate regional recipes and customs.
     
    Foods II
    5 Credits
    Grades  11, 12                                  
    Prerequisite: Foods I or Teacher Recommendation
    Students will use advanced cooking techniques in the preparation of soups, salads, casseroles, sauces, meat, fish and poultry, yeast breads, cakes and cake decorating.  Specialty food preparation such as cooking for the vegetarian, the small child or the elderly, large group entertaining, etc. is included.  Meal planning, smart shopping, servicing styles and table etiquette are also studied.  Students will access the internet where applicable.
     
     
    Fashion Technology
    5 Credits
    Grades: 9,10,11,12
    Students will explore their interest within the world of fashion.  This includes understanding the role clothing plays in our lives, how to make the best decisions regarding the selection and care of clothing.  Students will learn sewing techniques, and how to design and construct apparel using a pattern.  Fashion promotion and retailing as well as careers in the fashion industry will be examined.